Monday, February 1, 2010


It didn’t take long for me to discover why no one really wanted to work with children who experience paranormal activity in their homes. I was very often met with, “I don’t know,” and, “Um . . .” while the child was looking at their parents to provide an answer for them. Though it was frustrating and downright impossible at times, I knew that eventually we would get a case where talking with the children would prove useful.

The fist case that gave me that chance happened in the dead of Winter in a four-room house with only two space heaters for warmth. The family had come to us as a last resort because their ten year-old daughter *Kira was afraid to be in the house by herself. She claimed that a boy was waiting in the house for her every day after school and that he would make fun of her, pull her hair, and often try to scare her. On more than one occasion, her mother would leave work early because Kira would call her crying, saying that the boy was back; but when she got home, she couldn’t find him.

Frustrated, and nearly losing her job for all the times she had left, Kira’s mother had started refusing to come home early. She was convinced Kira was crying out for attention because she just didn’t like being home alone for two hours; but her mother had no other choice. It wasn’t until cabinet doors started opening and slamming shut --- seemingly on their own --- that Kira’s mother started to put more thought into the mysterious boy. Over the Summer, Kira had gone away to camp for a week, and her mother would return home to find papers scattered all over the floor and cabinet doors open. With no animals in the house, and no sign of a break-in, she was at a loss for what could be causing these small disturbances.

When Kira returned home from camp, things quieted down around the house, and Kira made no mention of the boy that she claimed had previously been picking on her. Satisfied that her daughter had lost her imaginary friend, Kira’s mother returned to work. Everything seemed fine until the Fall. When Kira returned to school, the disturbances returned. Towels would be thrown onto the floor, things on their shared dresser would be knocked over, and at one point, papers were thrown from the desk onto the floor close enough to a space heater that a small fire broke out. It was after the fire that Kira’s mother called us for help.

At first, Kira was like every other child I had come to work with: she couldn’t answer my questions, and continuously looked to her mother for answers. Finally, with permission from her mother, I took Kira to their bedroom and told her about my experience as a child. As soon as she learned that I didn’t think she was lying, and that I was there to help her, Kira started opening up about the boy who just wanted her to stay home and play with him.

Our investigation only lasted a little over two hours (because there is not much you can do in such a small house). We were able to catch some very clear EVPs, all in a child’s voice. Further research found that a family had been murdered in the same house. When presented with that information, Kira’s mother said that she was aware of the murder, and understood that when she had purchased the house, that was why it had been so cheap.

We couldn’t say whether or not Kira was in any real danger from the boy who was looking for a playmate, but we were concerned over the fact that one fire had all ready broken out because of his tantrums, and there could possibly be another. Kira’s mother asked for a cleansing and was provided with one; but she told us that the activity was still going on. We asked if we could help in any other way, but Kira’s mother said declined any further assistance.

Even though the case was several years ago, I still think about Kira, and wonder how her and her mother have dealt with the little boy that seems to be looking for someone to play with.